About dating violence

Forms of abuse can be physical, sexual, emotional and psychological.Victims and abusers come from all social and economic backgrounds, faith communities, and racial and ethnic backgrounds. Both females and males can be victims of dating violence, but numerous studies reveal the reality that the majority of victims are females (usually more than 95 percent).Throughout this Web site, victims are often referred to as females and abusers as male.That reference does not change the fact that every survivor -- male or female -- deserves support, options, resources and safety.However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.Teen dating violence [187KB, 2Pages, 508] is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional aggression within a dating relationship, including stalking.Emotional: Humiliating the victim in front of friends or making the victim feel guilty when she confronts the abuser about the abuse.Intimidation: Making the victim fearful by using threatening behavior, abuse of animals, verbal aggression or destruction of property.

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Several different words are used to describe teen dating violence.Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.According to national research, 1 out of 3 teens report knowing friends or peers who have experienced dating abuse.Worse, the Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey finds that 1 in 10 teens report being physically and/or sexually abused by a dating partner.

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